basic info : works

01 Bypass Surgery
02 Second Skin
03 Bearded Virgin
04 Insect Collection
05 Dialogue
06 Fertilization
07 Borderlne
08 Reformatory
09 Bodyspace
10 Dialectics of the Surface
11 Contacts and Kaski
12 Pyromania
13 Anti-dualistic Dualism
14 Neon-forest
15 various works



Nonstop (1998) is a three-metre-high steel wall at the Rastila subway station. It consists of 16 steel plates with a combined length of 32 metres and it weighs some 8000 kg. Some of the plates are polished stainless steel and are almost like mirrors. Others are painted glossy black using a car-painting technique, while yet others are in varying states of corrosion and decay. The use of both corroded and clean stainless steel is a comment on the dialogue between the transient and the permanent. The title Nonstop refers also to the steady stream of passengers on the way there and back. Nonstop is a play of constant alternation.
(c)Timo Heino


In his installation The Garden of Time (1997), Timo Heino combines shiny circular mirrors with a porous mass of dust. The dust spreads over the clinical mirror surfaces as some order of plant, or the mycelium of a fungus, living in symbiosis with its substratum. The smooth, easily cleaned surfaces are contrasted with the refuse of wear, posing problems in the shape of paired concepts such as culture / nature, noble / base, clean / dirty. The materials emphasise each other's intrinsic qualities but are aesthetically equal. The combination forms a visual contrast, while simultaneously disturbing the conceptual dichotomies. The central theme of the installation is temporality, which Heino treats in relation to corporeality and finitude.
(c) Marja Jalava


I found the shark jaw of My Pussycat Is Hungry (1998) from a small 'from floor to top everything you can imagine' kind of shop. The shop was along the street where most of the sex shops in Helsinki are also located. Founded from the middle of the porn area, the jaw got in my mind extremely bizarre character. Later on, I made them a cage of stainless steel in order to emphasize their aggressiveness and feminine form.
(c) Timo Heino


Object (1990) is a 'barrel,' two meters high, Ø 60 centimetres, bored full of holes. Inside the barrel there is a bright halogen light. When a spectator looks in through a hole, s/he sees from inside the line of holes on the opposite wall and, in this way, realises that s/he is looking in through a bull's eye, similar with those which s/he is seeing on the opposite side. Thus, Object is a kind of 'mirror without mirror.' The fact that every gaze is penetrating the target right in the middle (a bull's eye, number ten) is a sort of 'paradox of perfection.'
(c) Timo Heino